Help Kickstart BubbleSorter and GridSorter

I’ve always been careful to say that my new company, Musketeers.me, is a consulting and product company. Today we’re getting closer to the second (but to us, first) part of our mission. We’re launching a Kickstarter campaign to build two products: GridSorter and BubbleSorter.

GridSorter

GridSorter is best explained by relating the story of how Eli White first created the prototype: ever have a list of things that need doing around the house? Or worse, a honey-do list? Eli had that problem, and he’d already ranked everything by most important to least important. The problem was that when he had some spare time, he would look at the first thing on the list, which was a weekend-long project. So he’d put it down, and go do something else instead, and nothing was getting done. He quickly realized that he needed to categorize his tasks by both how long they’d take and how important they were.

Being a programmer, he naturally sat down and hacked out a solution: put his tasks on a grid, with one axis being importance and the other axis being time required. So now when he had an evening, he could simply look down the “takes an evening” column and grab the first task off the list, knowing he was getting the most important thing he could do with that time.

We’ve realized that a lot of you might have that problem, and the principle is even more powerful than just tasks versus time: you might have any number of things you need to sort by two different categories: for mojoLive we categorized our last push of features by importance versus user engagement, and picked the most important features that would also engage users. So the final product will have the ability to pick your two categories and drag and drop your list accordingly.

BubbleSorterBut what if you’re having trouble figuring out what’s important? Once I was trying to get a client to give us a prioritized list of tasks so we could ensure we did the most important things first, since the budget was tight and the list was long. They came back and said, “Well, everything here is Priority 1.” Not too helpful. But when I started asking, “Would you like to put more effort into Feature A or Feature B?” the client would quickly reply, “Feature B.” Out of that inspiration comes BubbleSorter.

While even just bringing in a list and prioritizing it is useful—and we’re going to give you that for free—it’s really useful when you have groups of people who are having trouble agreeing on a list of priorities. So for a low yearly subscription, you’ll be able to invite others to come in and perform the same ranking, and then using an algorithm we’ll be able to tell you what the group’s collective priorities are. This is really powerful if you’re regularly trying to get consensus in teams.

So help us make these products a reality: watch the video, see what you will get for each backing level, and join our Kickstarter.

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